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19F-Lanthanide Complexes: T1 - And T2 - Dependent Signal Gain Using Gradient Echoes

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Keliris,  A
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Mamedov,  I
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Scheffler,  K
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Hagberg, G., Keliris, A., Mamedov, I., Placidi, M., Merkle, H., Logothetis, N., et al. (2013). 19F-Lanthanide Complexes: T1 - And T2 - Dependent Signal Gain Using Gradient Echoes. Poster presented at 21st Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2013), Salt Lake City, UT, USA.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-55AD-D
Abstract
19F-labelled compounds have unique benefits for biological applications but are hampered by low sensitivity. Lanthanide-complexes that shorten the 19F T1 and T2 relaxation times can boost the SNR in spoiled gradient echo sequences (FLASH). We investigated the MRI signal systematically for a wide range of T1 and T2 times for FLASH and balanced steady state free precession (tFISP). For long T2 times the tFISP signal is always greater, and for short relaxation times the signal gain depends on the duration of encoding and spoiling. None of the available compounds had ‘ideal’ relaxation times that gives the highest possible signal. Our results can be used to design better 19F contrast agents tailored to a specific MRI sequence.