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Journal Article

Water footprints of cities - indicators for sustainable consumption and production

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hess-18-213-2014.pdf
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Supplementary Material (public)

hess-18-213-2014-supplement.pdf
(Supplementary material), 39KB

Citation

Hoff, H., Döll, P., Fader, M., Gerten, D., Hauser, S., & Siebert, S. (2014). Water footprints of cities - indicators for sustainable consumption and production. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 213-226. doi:10.5194/hess-18-213-2014.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-5F9B-7
Abstract
Water footprints have been proposed as sustainability indicators, relating the consumption of goods like food to the amount of water necessary for their production and the impacts of that water use in the source regions. We further developed the existing water footprint methodology, by globally resolving virtual water flows from production to consumption regions for major food crops at 5 arcmin spatial resolution. We distinguished domestic and international flows, and assessed local impacts of export production. Applying this method to three exemplary cities, Berlin, Delhi and Lagos, we find major differences in amounts, composition, and origin of green and blue virtual water imports, due to differences in diets, trade integration and crop water productivities in the source regions. While almost all of Delhi's and Lagos' virtual water imports are of domestic origin, Berlin on average imports from more than 4000 km distance, in particular soy (livestock feed), coffee and cocoa. While 42% of Delhi's virtual water imports are blue water based, the fractions for Berlin and Lagos are 2 and 0.5%, respectively, roughly equal to the water volumes abstracted in these two cities for domestic water use. Some of the external source regions of Berlin's virtual water imports appear to be critically water scarce and/or food insecure. However, for deriving recommendations on sustainable consumption and trade, further analysis of context-specific costs and benefits associated with export production will be required.