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Journal Article

Shamanism and efficacious exceptionalism

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Blackwell,  Aaron D.
Department of Human Behavior Ecology and Culture, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Purzycki,  Benjamin Grant
Department of Human Behavior Ecology and Culture, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Blackwell, A. D., & Purzycki, B. G. (2018). Shamanism and efficacious exceptionalism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 41: e69. doi:10.1017/S0140525X1700200X.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-66DE-3
Abstract
Shamans can have efficacy at healing through botanical remedies and in observational and advisory functions through cognitive strengths, while shamanic acts of strangeness are likely honest signals of these qualities. Given this potential for shamanic practices to have true efficacy and the capacity for honest signaling, we expect efficacy will influence the spread, persistence, and loss of shamanic practices.