English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Memory-related subjective cognitive symptoms in the adult population: Prevalence and associated factors: Results of the LIFE-Adult-Study

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons19981

Schroeter,  Matthias L.
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany;

/persons/resource/persons128137

Witte,  A. Veronica
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Collaborative Research Center Obesity Mechanisms, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Germany;

/persons/resource/persons20065

Villringer,  Arno
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)

Luck_Roehr_2018.pdf
(Publisher version), 696KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Luck, T., Roehr, S., Rodriguez, F. S., Schroeter, M. L., Witte, A. V., Hinz, A., et al. (2018). Memory-related subjective cognitive symptoms in the adult population: Prevalence and associated factors: Results of the LIFE-Adult-Study. BMC Psychology, 6: 23. doi:10.1186/s40359-018-0236-1.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-6E38-6
Abstract
Background: Subjectively perceived memory problems (memory-related Subjective Cognitive Symptoms/SCS) can be an indicator of a pre-prodromal or prodromal stage of a neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease. We therefore sought to provide detailed empirical information on memory-related SCS in the dementia-free adult population including information on prevalence rates, associated factors and others. Methods: We studied 8834 participants (40-79 years) of the population-based LIFE-Adult-Study. Weighted prevalence rates with confidence intervals (95%-CI) were calculated. Associations of memory-related SCS with participants' socio-demographic characteristics, physical and mental comorbidity, and cognitive performance (Verbal Fluency Test Animals, Trail-Making-Test, CERAD Wordlist tests) were analyzed. Results: Prevalence of total memory-related SCS was 53.0% (95%-CI=51.9-54.0): 26.0% (95%-CI=25.1-27.0) of the population had a subtype without related concerns, 23.6% (95%-CI=22.7-24.5) a subtype with some related concerns, and 3.3% (95%-CI=2.9-3.7) a subtype with strong related concerns. Report of memory-related SCS was unrelated to participants' socio-demographic characteristics, physical comorbidity (except history of stroke), depressive symptomatology, and anxiety. Adults with and without memory-related SCS showed no significant difference in cognitive performance. About one fifth (18.1%) of the participants with memory-related SCS stated that they did consult/want to consult a physician because of their experienced memory problems. Conclusions: Memory-related SCS are very common and unspecific in the non-demented adult population aged 40-79 years. Nonetheless, a substantial proportion of this population has concerns related to experienced memory problems and/or seeks help. Already available information on additional features associated with a higher likelihood of developing dementia in people with SCS may help clinicians to decide who should be monitored more closely.