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Journal Article

Application of the distance-based F test in an mGWAS investigating β diversity of intestinal microbiota identifies variants in SLC9A8 (NHE8) and 3 other loci

MPS-Authors
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Wang,  Jun
Guest Group Evolutionary Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Rausch,  Philipp
Guest Group Evolutionary Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Baines,  John F.
Guest Group Evolutionary Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Ruhlemann, M. C., Degenhardta, F., Thingholm, L. B., Wang, J., Skieceviciene, J., Rausch, P., et al. (2018). Application of the distance-based F test in an mGWAS investigating β diversity of intestinal microbiota identifies variants in SLC9A8 (NHE8) and 3 other loci. Gut Microbes, 9(1), 68-75. doi:10.1080/19490976.2017.1356979.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-704B-D
Abstract
Factors shaping the human intestinal microbiota range from environmental influences, like smoking and exercise, over dietary patterns and disease to the host's genetic variation. Recently, we could show in a microbiome genome-wide association study (mGWAS) targeting genetic variation influencing the β diversity of gut microbial communities, that approximately 10% of the overall gut microbiome variation can be explained by host genetics. Here, we report on the application of a new method for genotype-β-diversity association testing, the distance-based F (DBF) test. With this we identified 4 loci with genome-wide significant associations, harboring the genes CBEP4, SLC9A8, TNFSF4, and SP140, respectively. Our findings highlight the utility of the high-performance DBF test in β diversity GWAS and emphasize the important role of host genetics and immunity in shaping the human intestinal microbiota.