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On your own or in pairs: faster but less efficient spatial search during collaboration

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Kaiser,  K
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons215072

Hanrieder,  M
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons192615

Strickrodt,  M
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Hinterecker,  T
Project group: Social & Spatial Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Project group: Motion Perception & Simulation, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Project group: Cybernetics Approach to Perception & Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons84081

Meilinger,  T
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Project group: Social & Spatial Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Kaiser, K., Hanrieder, M., Strickrodt, M., Hinterecker, T., Bülthoff, H., & Meilinger, T. (2018). On your own or in pairs: faster but less efficient spatial search during collaboration. Poster presented at 6th Mind, Brain & Body Symposium in the framework of the International Brain Awareness Week (MBBS 2018), Berlin, Germany.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-7DFE-6
Abstract
Introduction: We require spatial problem solving skills regularly not only for common tasks, but also in dangerous circumstances such as emergency procedures, as the fire department encounters on a regular basis. Despite its importance, the topic has not been sufficiently investigated. Understanding the underlying cognitive processes that are involved in solving these problems will help provide supportive software and training methods to make collaborative spatial search more efficient and ideally less dangerous. Methods: The presented study aims to continue previous research conducted using two-dimensional means. We try to replicate previous findings in two experiments using an immersive virtual environment and investigate the extent of how a common reference frame can influence collaborative spatial search. Additionally, this study allows to examine how seeing your own orientation can influence spatial problem solving individually. Results: Results of two experiment suggest differences in performance between individual and collaborative search concerning complexity, showing a clear advantage of collaborative search when it comes to time, while the efficiency of each participant suffers greatly in these cases. A second experiment using common reference frames by introducing a compass-like arrow for collaborative search does not give a general advantage. The use of a compass may give a slight advantage for individuals in less complex environments. Discussion: It becomes clear that shared mental models do not automatically give an advantage in a realistic three-dimensional setting without training. Common reference frames should therefore not be generalized and need to be further investigated and differentiated to be integrated into supportive software or training methods.