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Auroral storm and polar arcs at Saturn ‐ Final Cassini/UVIS auroral observations

MPG-Autoren
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Roussos,  Elias
Department Planets and Comets, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

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Krupp,  Norbert
Department Planets and Comets, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Palmaerts, B., Radioti, A., Grodent, D., Yao, Z. H., Bradley, T. J., Roussos, E., et al. (2018). Auroral storm and polar arcs at Saturn ‐ Final Cassini/UVIS auroral observations. Geophysical Research Letters, 45(14), 6832-6842. doi:10.1029/2018GL078094.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-1856-3
Zusammenfassung
On 15 September 2017 the Cassini spacecraft plunged into Saturn's atmosphere after 13 years of successful exploration of the Saturnian system. The day before, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on board Cassini observed Saturn's northern aurora for about 14 h. During these observations, several auroral structures appeared, providing clues about processes simultaneously occurring in Saturn's magnetosphere. The observed dawn auroral enhancement together with the magnetic field and plasma wave data suggest that an intense flux closure process took place in the magnetotail. This enhanced magnetotail reconnection is likely caused by a magnetospheric compression induced by an interplanetary shock. Additionally, a polar arc is observed on the duskside, tracked for the first time from its growth until its quasi‐disappearance, and used as an indicator of reconnection location on the dayside magnetopause. Observation of an atypical auroral arc at very high latitudes supports the interplanetary shock scenario.