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Surface properties determining passage rates of proteins through nuclear pores.

MPS-Authors
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Frey,  S.
Department of Cellular Logistics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Rees,  R.
Department of Cellular Logistics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Schünemann,  J.
Department of Cellular Logistics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Ng,  S. C.
Department of Cellular Logistics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Fünfgeld,  K.
Department of Cellular Logistics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Huyton,  T.
Department of Cellular Logistics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Görlich,  D.
Department of Cellular Logistics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Supplementary Material (public)

2609078_Suppl_1.pdf
(Supplementary material), 205KB

2609078_Suppl_2.pdf
(Supplementary material), 237KB

Citation

Frey, S., Rees, R., Schünemann, J., Ng, S. C., Fünfgeld, K., Huyton, T., et al. (2018). Surface properties determining passage rates of proteins through nuclear pores. Cell, 174(1), 202-217. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2018.05.045.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-9899-7
Abstract
Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) conduct nucleocytoplasmic transport through an FG domain-controlled barrier. We now explore how surface-features of a mobile species determine its NPC passage rate. Negative charges and lysines impede passage. Hydrophobic residues, certain polar residues (Cys, His), and, surprisingly, charged arginines have striking translocation-promoting effects. Favorable cation-π interactions between arginines and FG-phenylalanines may explain this apparent paradox. Application of these principles to redesign the surface of GFP resulted in variants that show a wide span of transit rates, ranging from 35-fold slower than wild-type to ∼500 times faster, with the latter outpacing even naturally occurring nuclear transport receptors (NTRs). The structure of a fast and particularly FG-specific GFPNTR variant illustrates how NTRs can expose multiple regions for binding hydrophobic FG motifs while evading non-specific aggregation. Finally, we document that even for NTR-mediated transport, the surface-properties of the "passively carried" cargo can strikingly affect the translocation rate.