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Journal Article

The use of Hoechst dyes for DNA staining and beyond.

MPS-Authors
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Bucevicius,  J.
Laboratory of Chromatin Labeling and Imaging, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Lukinavicius,  G.
Laboratory of Chromatin Labeling and Imaging, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Gerasimaite,  R.
Department of Cellular Logistics, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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2616275.pdf
(Publisher version), 18MB

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Citation

Bucevicius, J., Lukinavicius, G., & Gerasimaite, R. (2018). The use of Hoechst dyes for DNA staining and beyond. Chemosensors, 6(2): 18. doi:10.3390/chemosensors6020018.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-A4FE-8
Abstract
Hoechst dyes are among the most popular fluorophores used to stain DNA in living and fixed cells. Moreover, their high affinity and specificity towards DNA make Hoechst dyes excellent targeting moieties, which can be conjugated to various other molecules in order to tether them to DNA. The recent developments in the fields of microscopy and flow cytometry have sparked interest in such composite molecules, whose applications range from investigating nucleus microenvironment to drug delivery into tumours. Here we provide an overview of the properties of Hoechst dyes and discuss recent developments in Hoechst-based composite probes.