English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Ultra-strong and damage tolerant metallic bulk materials: A lesson from nanostructured pearlitic steel wires

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons125256

Li,  Yujiao
Alloy Design and Thermomechanical Processing, Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons125156

Goto,  Shoji
Materials Science of Mechanical Contracts, Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Society;
Akita University, Tegata Gakuencho, Akita 010-8502, Japan;

/persons/resource/persons125330

Raabe,  Dierk
Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design, Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Hohenwarter, A., Völker, B., Kapp, M. W., Li, Y., Goto, S., Raabe, D., et al. (2016). Ultra-strong and damage tolerant metallic bulk materials: A lesson from nanostructured pearlitic steel wires. Scientific Reports, 6: 33228. doi:10.1038/srep33228.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-B219-A
Abstract
Structural materials used for safety critical applications require high strength and simultaneously high resistance against crack growth, referred to as damage tolerance. However, the two properties typically exclude each other and research efforts towards ever stronger materials are hampered by drastic loss of fracture resistance. Therefore, future development of novel ultra-strong bulk materials requires a fundamental understanding of the toughness determining mechanisms. As model material we use today's strongest metallic bulk material, namely, a nanostructured pearlitic steel wire, and measured the fracture toughness on micron-sized specimens in different crack growth directions and found an unexpected strong anisotropy in the fracture resistance. Along the wire axis the material reveals ultra-high strength combined with so far unprecedented damage tolerance. We attribute this excellent property combination to the anisotropy in the fracture toughness inducing a high propensity for micro-crack formation parallel to the wire axis. This effect causes a local crack tip stress relaxation and enables the high fracture toughness without being detrimental to the material's strength. © 2016 The Author(s).