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Journal Article

Subtle left-right asymmetry of gene expression profiles in embryonic and foetal human brains

MPS-Authors
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De Kovel,  Carolien G. F.
Language and Genetics Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Fisher,  Simon E.
Language and Genetics Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Francks,  Clyde
Language and Genetics Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Imaging Genomics, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

DeKovel_etal_2018.pdf
(Publisher version), 3MB

Supplementary Material (public)

41598_2018_29496_MOESM1_ESM.docx
(Supplementary material), 798KB

41598_2018_29496_MOESM2_ESM.xlsx
(Supplementary material), 884KB

41598_2018_29496_MOESM3_ESM.xlsx
(Supplementary material), 19KB

41598_2018_29496_MOESM4_ESM.xlsx
(Supplementary material), 904KB

41598_2018_29496_MOESM5_ESM.xlsx
(Supplementary material), 769KB

41598_2018_29496_MOESM6_ESM.xlsx
(Supplementary material), 798KB

41598_2018_29496_MOESM7_ESM.xlsx
(Supplementary material), 14KB

Citation

De Kovel, C. G. F., Lisgo, S. N., Fisher, S. E., & Francks, C. (2018). Subtle left-right asymmetry of gene expression profiles in embryonic and foetal human brains. Scientific Reports, 8: 12606. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-29496-2.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-B392-F
Abstract
Left-right laterality is an important aspect of human –and in fact all vertebrate– brain organization for which the genetic basis is poorly understood. Using RNA sequencing data we contrasted gene expression in left- and right-sided samples from several structures of the anterior central nervous systems of post mortem human embryos and foetuses. While few individual genes stood out as significantly lateralized, most structures showed evidence of laterality of their overall transcriptomic profiles. These left-right differences showed overlap with age-dependent changes in expression, indicating lateralized maturation rates, but not consistently in left-right orientation over all structures. Brain asymmetry may therefore originate in multiple locations, or if there is a single origin, it is earlier than 5 weeks post conception, with structure-specific lateralized processes already underway by this age. This pattern is broadly consistent with the weak correlations reported between various aspects of adult brain laterality, such as language dominance and handedness.