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Characterizing the genetic history of admixture across inner Eurasia

MPS-Authors
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Jeong,  Choongwon
Eurasia3angle, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Immel,  Alexander
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Wang,  Chuan-Chao
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Robbeets,  Martine
Eurasia3angle, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Schiffels,  Stephan
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Haak,  Wolfgang
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Krause,  Johannes
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Jeong, C., Balanovsky, O., Lukianova, E., Kahbatkyzy, N., Flegontov, P., Zaporozhchenko, V., et al. (2018). Characterizing the genetic history of admixture across inner Eurasia. bioRxiv, 327122. doi:10.1101/327122.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-DFA6-9
Abstract
The indigenous populations of inner Eurasia, a huge geographic region covering the central Eurasian steppe and the northern Eurasian taiga and tundra, harbor tremendous diversity in their genes, cultures and languages. In this study, we report novel genome-wide data for 763 individuals from Armenia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Mongolia, Russia, Tajikistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. We furthermore report genome-wide data of two Eneolithic individuals (~5,400 years before present) associated with the Botai culture in northern Kazakhstan. We find that inner Eurasian populations are structured into three distinct admixture clines stretching between various western and eastern Eurasian ancestries. This genetic separation is well mirrored by geography. The ancient Botai genomes suggest yet another layer of admixture in inner Eurasia that involves Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in Europe, the Upper Paleolithic southern Siberians and East Asians. Admixture modeling of ancient and modern populations suggests an overwriting of this ancient structure in the Altai-Sayan region by migrations of western steppe herders, but partial retaining of this ancient North Eurasian-related cline further to the North. Finally, the genetic structure of Caucasus populations highlights a role of the Caucasus Mountains as a barrier to gene flow and suggests a post-Neolithic gene flow into North Caucasus populations from the steppe.