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Effect of uniaxial stress on the magnetic phases of CeAuSb2

MPG-Autoren
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Park,  Joonbum
Physics of Quantum Materials, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Mackenzie,  Andrew P.
Andrew Mackenzie, Physics of Quantum Materials, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Hicks,  Clifford W.
Clifford Hicks, Physics of Quantum Materials, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Park, J., Sakai, H., Mackenzie, A. P., & Hicks, C. W. (2018). Effect of uniaxial stress on the magnetic phases of CeAuSb2. Physical Review B, 98(2): 024426, pp. 1-7. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.98.024426.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-E2BF-9
Zusammenfassung
We present results of measurements of resistivity of CeAuSb2 under the combination of c-axis magnetic field and in-plane uniaxial stress. In unstressed CeAuSb2 there are two magnetic phases. The low-field A phase is a single-component spin-density wave (SDW), with q = (eta, +/-eta, 1/2), and the high-field B phase consists of microscopically coexisting (eta, eta, 1/2) and (eta, -eta, 1/2) spin-density waves. Pressure along a < 100 > lattice direction is a transverse field to both of these phases and so initially has little effect, however it eventually induces new low-and high-field phases in which the principal axes of the SDW components appear to have rotated to the < 100 > directions. Under this strong < 100 > compression, the field evolution of the resistivity is much smoother than at zero strain: In zero strain, there is a strong first-order transition, while under strong < 100 > it becomes much broader. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the uniaxial stress lifting the degeneracy between the (100) and (010) directions.