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Domes and cones : adhesion-induced fission of membranes by ESCRT proteins

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Agudo-Canalejo,  Jaime
Theorie & Bio-Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Lipowsky,  Reinhard
Reinhard Lipowsky, Theorie & Bio-Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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journal.pcbi.1006422.pdf
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Citation

Agudo-Canalejo, J., & Lipowsky, R. (2018). Domes and cones: adhesion-induced fission of membranes by ESCRT proteins. PLoS Computational Biology, 14(8): e1006422. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006422.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-06D2-A
Abstract
Membrane fission is a crucial step in many biological processes ranging from cell division to viral budding. During fission, the membrane forms a narrow neck that is subsequently cleaved by proteins. ESCRT proteins initiate this process by forming supramolecular assemblies that adhere to the cytosolic face of the membranes. However, how these assemblies achieve the closure and scission of membrane necks is still a matter of controversy. Here, we elucidate and compare the two most prominent mechanisms that have been proposed for ESCRT-induced membrane fission. In both mechanisms, the ESCRT molecules form assemblies that adhere to the open neck of the membrane bud. In the first mechanism, these assemblies grow in a dome-like shape, whereas in the second mechanism the assemblies take a cone-like shape and flatten as they grow. Our computational study shows that the minimal strength of membrane–protein adhesion necessary for cone-induced fission is lower than for dome-induced fission, and that cones generate higher constriction forces of the order of 100 pN onto the membrane necks.