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Neandertal and Denisovan DNA from Pleistocene sediments

MPG-Autoren

Slon,  Viviane
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Hopfe,  Charlotte
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Weiss,  Clemens L.
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Mafessoni,  Fabrizio
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Aximu-Petri,  Ayinuer
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Essel,  Elena
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Nagel,  Sarah
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Nickel,  Birgit
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Schmidt,  Anna
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Pruefer,  Kay
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Kelso,  Janet
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Burbano,  Hernan A.
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Paeaebo,  Svante
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

Meyer,  Matthias
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Slon, V., Hopfe, C., Weiss, C. L., Mafessoni, F., de la Rasilla, M., Lalueza-Fox, C., et al. (2017). Neandertal and Denisovan DNA from Pleistocene sediments. Science, 356(6338), 605-+. doi:10.1126/science.aam9695.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-04F6-4
Zusammenfassung
Although a rich record of Pleistocene human-associated archaeological assemblages exists, the scarcity of hominin fossils often impedes the understanding of which hominins occupied a site. Using targeted enrichment of mitochondrial DNA, we show that cave sediments represent a rich source of ancient mammalian DNA that often includes traces of hominin DNA, even at sites and in layers where no hominin remains have been discovered. By automation-assisted screening of numerous sediment samples, we detected Neandertal DNA in eight archaeological layers from four caves in Eurasia. In Denisova Cave, we retrieved Denisovan DNA in a Middle Pleistocene layer near the bottom of the stratigraphy. Our work opens the possibility of detecting the presence of hominin groups at sites and in areas where no skeletal remains are found.