English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Fast interleaved multislice T1 mapping: Model-based reconstruction of single-shot inversion-recovery radial FLASH.

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons181076

Wang,  X.
Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons15968

Voit,  D.
Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons136471

Roeloffs,  V. B.
Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons15082

Frahm,  J.
Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)

2639856.pdf
(Publisher version), 9MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Wang, X., Voit, D., Roeloffs, V. B., Uecker, M., & Frahm, J. (2018). Fast interleaved multislice T1 mapping: Model-based reconstruction of single-shot inversion-recovery radial FLASH. Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine, 2018: 2560964. doi:10.1155/2018/2560964.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-0A12-F
Abstract
Purpose. To develop a high-speed multislice T1 mapping method based on a single-shot inversion-recovery (IR) radial FLASH acquisition and a regularized model-based reconstruction. Methods. Multislice radial k-space data are continuously acquired after a single nonselective inversion pulse using a golden-angle sampling scheme in a spoke-interleaved manner with optimized flip angles. Parameter maps and coil sensitivities of each slice are estimated directly from highly undersampled radial k-space data using a model-based nonlinear inverse reconstruction in conjunction with joint sparsity constraints. The performance of the method has been validated using a numerical and experimental T1 phantom as well as demonstrated for studies of the human brain and liver at 3T. Results. The proposed method allows for 7 simultaneous T1 maps of the brain at 0.5 x 0.5 x 4 mm(3) resolution within a single IR experiment of 4 s duration. Phantom studies confirm similar accuracy and precision as obtained for a single-slice acquisition. For abdominal applications, the proposed method yields three simultaneous T1 maps at 1.25 x 1.25 x 6 mm(3) resolution within a 4 s breath hold. Conclusion. Rapid, robust, accurate, and precise multislice T1 mapping may be achieved by combining the advantages of a model-based nonlinear inverse reconstruction, radial sampling, parallel imaging, and compressed sensing.