English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Motor reproduction of time interval depends on internal temporal cues in the brain: Sensorimotor imagery in rhythm

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons200458

Daikoku,  Tatsuya
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Daikoku_Takasashi_2018.pdf
(Publisher version), 3MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Daikoku, T., Takahashi, Y., Tarumoto, N., & Yasuda, H. (2018). Motor reproduction of time interval depends on internal temporal cues in the brain: Sensorimotor imagery in rhythm. Frontiers in Psychology, 9: 1747. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01873.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-4E13-2
Abstract
How the human brain perceives time intervals is a fascinating topic that has been explored in many fields of study. This study examined how time intervals are replicated in three conditions: with no internalized cue (PT), with an internalized cue without a beat (AS), and with an internalized cue with a beat (RS). In PT, participants accurately reproduced the time intervals up to approximately 3 s. Over 3 s, however, the reproduction errors became increasingly negative. In RS, longer presentations of over 5.6 s and 13 beats induced accurate time intervals in reproductions. This suggests longer exposure to beat presentation leads to stable internalization and efficiency in the sensorimotor processing of perception and reproduction. In AS, up to approximately 3 s, the results were similar to those of RS whereas over 3 s, the results shifted and became similar to those of PT. The time intervals between the first two stimuli indicate that the strategies of time-interval reproduction in AS may shift from RS to PT. Neural basis underlying the reproduction of time intervals without a beat may depend on length of time interval between adjacent stimuli in sequences.