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Human V6 Integrates Visual and Extra-Retinal Cues during Head-Induced Gaze Shifts

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Schindler,  A
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Bartels,  A
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Schindler, A., & Bartels, A. (2018). Human V6 Integrates Visual and Extra-Retinal Cues during Head-Induced Gaze Shifts. iScience, 7, 191-197. doi:10.1016/j.isci.2018.09.004.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-4B2B-B
Abstract
A key question in vision research concerns how the brain compensates for self-induced eye and head movements to form the world-centered, spatiotopic representations we perceive. Although human V3A and V6 integrate eye movements with vision, it is unclear which areas integrate head motion signals with visual retinotopic representations, as fMRI typically prevents head movement executions. Here we examined whether human early visual cortex V3A and V6 integrate these signals. A previously introduced paradigm allowed participant head movement during trials, but stabilized the head during data acquisition utilizing the delay between blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) and neural signals. Visual stimuli simulated either a stable environment or one with arbitrary head-coupled visual motion. Importantly, both conditions were matched in retinal and head motion. Contrasts revealed differential responses in human V6. Given the lack of vestibular responses in primate V6, these results suggest multi-modal integration of visual with neck efference copy signals or proprioception in V6.