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Distinct modes of functional connectivity induced by movie-watching

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Deco,  Gustavo
Computational Neuroscience Group, Department of Information and Communication Technologies, Center for Brain and Cognition, University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain;
Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain;
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia;

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Citation

Demirtas, M., Ponce-Alvarez, A., Gilson, M., Hagmann, P., Mantini, D., Betti, V., et al. (2019). Distinct modes of functional connectivity induced by movie-watching. NeuroImage, 184, 335-348. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.09.042.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-4F28-A
Abstract
A fundamental question in systems neuroscience is how endogenous neuronal activity self-organizes during particular brain states. Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated systematic relationships between resting-state and task-induced functional connectivity (FC). In particular, continuous task studies, such as movie watching, speak to alterations in coupling among cortical regions and enhanced fluctuations in FC compared to the resting-state. This suggests that FC may reflect systematic and large-scale reorganization of functionally integrated responses while subjects are watching movies. In this study, we characterized fluctuations in FC during resting-state and movie-watching conditions. We found that the FC patterns induced systematically by movie-watching can be explained with a single principal component. These condition-specific FC fluctuations overlapped with inter-subject synchronization patterns in occipital and temporal brain regions. However, unlike inter-subject synchronization, condition-specific FC patterns were characterized by increased correlations within frontal brain regions and reduced correlations between frontal-parietal brain regions. We investigated these condition-specific functional variations as a shorter time scale, using time-resolved FC. The time-resolved FC showed condition-specificity over time; notably when subjects watched both the same and different movies. To explain self-organisation of global FC through the alterations in local dynamics, we used a large-scale computational model. We found that condition-specific reorganization of FC could be explained by local changes that engendered changes in FC among higher-order association regions, mainly in frontal and parietal cortices.