English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Sensory experience inversely regulates feedforward and feedback excitation-inhibition ratio in rodent visual cortex

MPS-Authors

Richter,  L.M.
Computation in Neural Circuits Group, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons207974

Gjorgjieva,  Julijana
Computation in Neural Circuits Group, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Miska, N., Richter, L., Cary, B., Gjorgjieva, J., & Turrigiano, G. (2018). Sensory experience inversely regulates feedforward and feedback excitation-inhibition ratio in rodent visual cortex. eLife. doi:10.7554/eLife.38846.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-747F-E
Abstract
Brief (2-3d) monocular deprivation (MD) during the critical period induces a profound loss of responsiveness within binocular (V1b) and monocular (V1m) regions of rodent primary visual cortex. This has largely been ascribed to long-term depression (LTD) at thalamocortical synapses, while a contribution from intracortical inhbition has been controversial. Here we used optogenetics to isolate and measure feedfoward thalamocortical and feedback intracortical excitation-inhibition (E-I9 rations unaffected in V1b and shifted toward excitation in V1m, indicating that thalamocortical excitation was not effectively reduced. In contrast, feedback intracortical E-I ratio was shifted toward inhibition in V1m, and a computational model demonstrated that these opposing shifts produced an overall suppression of layer 4 excitability. Thus, feedforward and feedback E-I rations can be independently tuned by visual experience, and enhanced feedback inhibition is the primary forec behind loss of visual responsiveness