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Journal Article

Individual synaptic vesicles mediate stimulated exocytosis from cochlear inner hair cells.

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Grabner,  C.
Research Group of Synaptic Nanophysiology, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Moser,  T.
Research Group of Synaptic Nanophysiology, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

3010350.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)

3010350-Suppl.pdf
(Supplementary material), 70KB

Citation

Grabner, C., & Moser, T. (2018). Individual synaptic vesicles mediate stimulated exocytosis from cochlear inner hair cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 115(50), 12811-12816. doi:10.1073/pnas.1811814115.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-8DC1-5
Abstract
Spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) measured from the first synapse in the mammalian auditory pathway reach a large mean amplitude with a high level of variance (CV between 0.3 and 1). This has led some to propose that each inner hair cell (IHC) ribbon-type active zone (AZ), on average, releases ∼6 synaptic vesicles (SVs) per sEPSC in a coordinated manner. If true, then the predicted change in membrane capacitance (Cm) for such multivesicular fusion events would equate to ∼300 attofarads (aF). Here, we performed cell-attached Cm measurements to directly examine the size of fusion events at the basolateral membrane of IHCs where the AZs are located. The frequency of events depended on the membrane potential and the expression of Cav1.3, the principal Ca2+-channel type of IHCs. Fusion events averaged 40 aF, which equates to a normal-sized SV with an estimated diameter of 37 nm. The calculated SV volumes showed a high degree of variance (CV > 0.6). These results indicate that SVs fused individually with the plasma membrane during spontaneous and evoked release and SV volume may contribute more variability in EPSC amplitude than previously assumed.