English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

A planar dielectric antenna for directional single-photon emission and near-unity collection efficiency

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons201175

Sandoghdar,  Vahid
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons201072

Götzinger,  Stephan
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Lee, K. G., Chen, X. W., Eghlidi, H., Kukura, P., Lettow, R., Renn, A., et al. (2011). A planar dielectric antenna for directional single-photon emission and near-unity collection efficiency. Nature Photonics, 5, 166-169. doi:10.1038/NPHOTON.2010.312.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-9A27-5
Abstract
Single emitters have been considered as sources of single photons in various contexts, including cryptography, quantum computation, spectroscopy and metrology(1-3). The success of these applications will crucially rely on the efficient directional emission of photons into well-defined modes. To accomplish high efficiency, researchers have investigated microcavities at cryogenic temperatures(4,5), photonic nanowires(6,7) and near-field coupling to metallic nano-antennas(8-10). However, despite impressive progress, the existing realizations substantially fall short of unity collection efficiency. Here, we report on a theoretical and experimental study of a dielectric planar antenna, which uses a layered structure to tailor the angular emission of a single oriented molecule. We demonstrate a collection efficiency of 96% using a microscope objective at room temperature and obtain record detection rates of similar to 50 MHz. Our scheme is wavelength-insensitive and can be readily extended to other solid-state emitters such as colour centres(11,12) and semiconductor quantum dots(13,14).