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The prosecutor of a permanent international criminal court : international workshop in co-operation with the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR), Freiburg im Breisgau, May 1998

MPS-Authors

Arbour,  Louise
Criminal Law, Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Max Planck Society;

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Supplementary Material (public)

S_81_Inhaltsverzeichnis.pdf
(Supplementary material), 73KB

Citation

Arbour, L. (Ed.). (2000). The prosecutor of a permanent international criminal court: international workshop in co-operation with the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR), Freiburg im Breisgau, May 1998. Freiburg i. Br.: edition iuscrim.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-A342-B
Abstract
In establishing an International Criminal Court there are few precedents to follow. Difficulties abound, including the determination of the appropriate form for the Office of the Prosecutor. In this decision, one set of experiences to be drawn upon is that of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). Another is that of the many national criminal jurisdictions around the world. Therefore, the Office of the Prosecutor of the ICTY/ICTR and the Max Planck Institute of Foreign and International Criminal Law decided to draw on these experiences by commissioning reports from various national jurisdictions. These reports, which are structured along similar lines, address que-stions that are likely to be relevant in the context of an International Criminal Court. We hope that this volume will help not only to establish the basis for a strong prosecutor's office in the ICC but also that it will help to identify some of the problems that will inevitably arise when the ICC is established and that it will provide guidance on how these problems might be resolved.