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Deterministic fate assignment of Muller glia cells in the zebrafish retina suggests a clonal backbone during development

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Rulands,  Steffen
Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Rulands, S., Iglesias-Gonzalez, A. B., & Boije, H. (2018). Deterministic fate assignment of Muller glia cells in the zebrafish retina suggests a clonal backbone during development. European Journal of Neuroscience, 48(12), 3597-3605. doi:10.1111/ejn.14257.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-BDB3-F
Abstract
The optic cup houses multipotent retinal progenitor cells that proliferate and differentiate to form the mature retina, containing five main types of neurons and a single glial cell type, the Muller cell. Progenitors of the zebrafish optic cup generate clones that vary regarding the number and types of neurons, a process we previously showed could be described by stochastic models. Here, we present data indicating that each retinal progenitor cell, in the 24 hrs post-fertilization optic cup, is predestined to form a single Muller cell. This striking fate assignment of Muller cells reveals a dual nature of retinal lineages where stochastic mechanisms produce variable numbers of neurons while there is a strong deterministic component governing the formation of glia cells. A possible mechanism for this stereotypic fate assignment could be the maintenance of a clonal backbone during retina development, which would be similar to invertebrate and rodent cortical neurogenesis.