English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Contributions of left frontal and temporal cortex to sentence comprehension: Evidence from simultaneous TMS-EEG

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons117819

Kroczek,  Leon
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Department of Psychology, University of Regensburg, Germany;

/persons/resource/persons19687

Gunter,  Thomas C.
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons209295

Rysop,  Anna
Lise Meitner Research Group Cognition and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19643

Friederici,  Angela D.
Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons185449

Hartwigsen,  Gesa
Lise Meitner Research Group Cognition and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)

Kroczek_Cortex2019.pdf
(Preprint), 5MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Kroczek, L., Gunter, T. C., Rysop, A., Friederici, A. D., & Hartwigsen, G. (2019). Contributions of left frontal and temporal cortex to sentence comprehension: Evidence from simultaneous TMS-EEG. Cortex, 115, 86-98. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2019.01.010.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-C74F-6
Abstract
Sentence comprehension requires the rapid analysis of semantic and syntactic information. These processes are supported by a left hemispheric dominant fronto-temporal network, including left posterior inferior frontal gyrus (pIFG) and posterior superior temporal gyrus/sulcus (pSTG/STS). Previous electroencephalography (EEG) studies have associated semantic expectancy within a sentence with a modulation of the N400 and syntactic gender violations with increases in the LAN and P600. Here, we combined focal perturbations of neural activity by means of short bursts of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with simultaneous EEG recordings to probe the functional relevance of pIFG and pSTG/STS for sentence comprehension. We applied 10 Hz TMS bursts of three pulses at verb onset during auditory presentation of short sentences. Verb-based semantic expectancy and article-based syntactic gender requirement were manipulated for the sentence final noun. We did not find any TMS effect at the noun. However, TMS had a short-lasting impact at the mid-sentence verb that differed for the two stimulation sites. Specifically, TMS over pIFG elicited a frontal positivity in the first 200 ms post verb onset whereas TMS over pSTG/STS was limited to a parietal negativity at 200-400 ms post verb onset. This indicates that during verb processing in sentential context, frontal brain areas play an earlier role than temporal areas in predicting the upcoming noun. The short-living perturbation effects at the mid-sentence verb suggest a high degree of online compensation within the language system since the sentence final noun processing was unaffected.