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Non-native listeners benefit less from gestures and visible speech than native listeners during degraded speech comprehension

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Drijvers,  Linda
Center for Language Studies , External Organizations;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
International Max Planck Research School for Language Sciences, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
The Communicative Brain, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons142

Ozyurek,  Asli
Center for Language Studies , External Organizations;
Research Associates, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;
Multimodal Language and Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, External Organizations;

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Citation

Drijvers, L., & Ozyurek, A. (2020). Non-native listeners benefit less from gestures and visible speech than native listeners during degraded speech comprehension. Language and Speech, 63(2), 209-220. doi:10.1177/0023830919831311.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-D55E-5
Abstract
Native listeners benefit from both visible speech and iconic gestures to enhance degraded speech comprehension (Drijvers & Ozyürek, 2017). We tested how highly proficient non-native listeners benefit from these visual articulators compared to native listeners. We presented videos of an actress uttering a verb in clear, moderately, or severely degraded speech, while her lips were blurred, visible, or visible and accompanied by a gesture. Our results revealed that unlike native listeners, non-native listeners were less likely to benefit from the combined enhancement of visible speech and gestures, especially since the benefit from visible speech was minimal when the signal quality was not sufficient.