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Journal Article

Effects of aging on T1, T2*, and QSM MRI values in the subcortex

MPS-Authors
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Bazin,  Pierre-Louis
Department Neurophysics (Weiskopf), MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Turner,  Robert
External Organizations;
Department Neurophysics, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Keuken_Bazin_2017.pdf
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Citation

Keuken, M. C., Bazin, P.-L., Backhouse, K., Beekhuizen, S., Himmer, L., Kandola, A., et al. (2017). Effects of aging on T1, T2*, and QSM MRI values in the subcortex. Brain Structure & Function, 222(6), 2487-2505. doi:10.1007/s00429-016-1352-4.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-E131-8
Abstract
The aging brain undergoes several anatomical changes that can be measured with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Early studies using lower field strengths have assessed changes in tissue properties mainly qualitatively, using T1- or T∗2- weighted images to provide image contrast. With the development of higher field strengths (7 T and above) and more advanced MRI contrasts, quantitative measures can be acquired even of small subcortical structures. This study investigates volumetric, spatial, and quantitative MRI parameter changes associated with healthy aging in a range of subcortical nuclei, including the basal ganglia, red nucleus, and the periaqueductal grey. The results show that aging has a heterogenous effects across regions. Across the subcortical areas an increase of T1 values is observed, most likely indicating a loss of myelin. Only for a number of areas, a decrease of T∗2 and increase of QSM is found, indicating an increase of iron. Aging also results in a location shift for a number of structures indicating the need for visualization of the anatomy of individual brains.