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Disease-specific regions outperform whole-brain approaches in identifying progressive supranuclear palsy: A multicentric MRI study

MPS-Authors
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Mueller,  Karsten
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Möller,  Harald E.
Methods and Development Unit Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Schroeter,  Matthias L.
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Mueller_Jech_Bonnet_2017.pdf
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Citation

Mueller, K., Jech, R., Bonnet, C., Tintěra, J., Hanuška, J., Möller, H. E., et al. (2017). Disease-specific regions outperform whole-brain approaches in identifying progressive supranuclear palsy: A multicentric MRI study. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 11: 100. doi:10.3389/fnins.2017.00100.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-E5C7-B
Abstract
To identify progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), we combined voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and support vector machine (SVM) classification using disease-specific features in multicentric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Structural brain differences were investigated at four centers between 20 patients with PSP and 20 age-matched healthy controls with T1-weighted MRI at 3T. To pave the way for future application in personalized medicine, we applied SVM classification to identify PSP on an individual level besides group analyses based on VBM. We found a major decline in gray matter density in the brainstem, insula, and striatum, and also in frontomedian regions, which is in line with current literature. Moreover, SVM classification yielded high accuracy rates above 80% for disease identification in imaging data. Focusing analyses on disease-specific regions-of-interest (ROI) led to higher accuracy rates compared to a whole-brain approach. Using a polynomial kernel (instead of a linear kernel) led to an increased sensitivity and a higher specificity of disease detection. Our study supports the application of MRI for individual diagnosis of PSP, if combined with SVM approaches. We demonstrate that SVM classification provides high accuracy rates in multicentric data—a prerequisite for potential application in diagnostic routine.