English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

The MinDE system is a generic spatial cue for membrane protein distribution in vitro

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons213332

Ramm,  Beatrice
Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons217931

Glock,  Philipp
Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons138355

Mücksch,  Jonas
Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons215565

Blumhardt,  Philipp
Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons215956

Garcia-Soriano,  Daniela
Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons197087

Heymann,  Michael
Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons15815

Schwille,  Petra
Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
Fulltext (public)

Ramm_s41467-018-06310-1.pdf
(Publisher version), 5MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Ramm, B., Glock, P., Mücksch, J., Blumhardt, P., Garcia-Soriano, D., Heymann, M., et al. (2018). The MinDE system is a generic spatial cue for membrane protein distribution in vitro. Nature Communications, 9: 3942. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-06310-1.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-F333-2
Abstract
The E. coli MinCDE system has become a paradigmatic reaction–diffusion system in biology. The membrane-bound ATPase MinD and ATPase-activating protein MinE oscillate between the cell poles followed by MinC, thus positioning the main division protein FtsZ at midcell. Here we report that these energy-consuming MinDE oscillations may play a role beyond constraining MinC/FtsZ localization. Using an in vitro reconstitution assay, we show that MinDE self-organization can spatially regulate a variety of functionally completely unrelated membrane proteins into patterns and gradients. By concentration waves sweeping over the membrane, they induce a direct net transport of tightly membrane-attached molecules. That the MinDE system can spatiotemporally control a much larger set of proteins than previously known, may constitute a MinC-independent pathway to division site selection and chromosome segregation. Moreover, the here described phenomenon of active transport through a traveling diffusion barrier may point to a general mechanism of spatiotemporal regulation in cells.