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In-depth structural analysis of glycans in the gas phase

MPS-Authors
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Mucha,  Eike
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;
Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin;

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Stuckmann,  Alexandra
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;
Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin;

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Marianski,  Mateusz
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Meijer,  Gerard
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Pagel,  Kevin
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;
Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin;

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c8sc05426f.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

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Citation

Mucha, E., Stuckmann, A., Marianski, M., Struwe, W. B., Meijer, G., & Pagel, K. (2019). In-depth structural analysis of glycans in the gas phase. Chemical Science, 10(5), 1272-1284. doi:10.1039/c8sc05426f.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-FC04-E
Abstract
Although there have been substantial improvements in glycan analysis over the past decade, the lack of both high-resolution and high-throughput methods hampers progress in glycomics. This perspective article highlights the current developments of liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, ion-mobility spectrometry and cryogenic IR spectroscopy for glycan analysis and gives a critical insight to their individual strengths and limitations. Moreover, we discuss a novel concept in which ion mobility-mass spectrometry and cryogenic IR spectroscopy is combined in a single instrument such that datasets consisting of m/z, collision cross sections and IR fingerprints can be obtained. This multidimensional data will then be compared to a comprehensive reference library of intact glycans and their fragments to accurately identify unknown glycans on a high-throughput scale with minimal sample requirements. Due to the complementarity of the obtained information, this novel approach is highly diagnostic and also suitable for the identification of larger glycans; however, the workflow and instrumentation is straightforward enough to be implemented into a user-friendly setup.