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Journal Article

On the Role of the eastern Pacific teleconnection in ENSO impacts on wintertime weather over East Asia and North America

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Dai,  Ying
external;
Director’s Research Group OES, The Ocean in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

jcli-d-17-0789.1.pdf
(Publisher version), 14MB

Supplementary Material (public)

10.1175_JCLI-D-17-0789.s1.pdf
(Supplementary material), 17MB

Citation

Dai, Y., & Tan, B. (2019). On the Role of the eastern Pacific teleconnection in ENSO impacts on wintertime weather over East Asia and North America. Journal of Climate, 32, 1217-1234. doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0789.1.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-FE97-6
Abstract
Previous studies have mainly focused on the influence of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on seasonal-mean conditions over East Asia and North America. This study, instead, proposes an ENSO pathway that influences the weather events over East Asia and North America, in which the eastern Pacific teleconnection pattern (EP) plays an important role. On the one hand, the EP pattern can induce significant surface temperature anomalies over East Asia during its development and mature stages, with the positive (negative) EPs causing colder (warmer) than normal weather events. Besides, the frequency of occurrence of EPs is significantly modulated by ENSO, with 50% of the positive EPs occurring in La Nina winters, and 47% of the negative EPs occurring in El Nino winters. As a result, in El Nino winters, more negative and fewer positive EPs tend to occur, and thus more warm and fewer cold weather events are expected in East Asia. For La Nina winters, the reverse is true. On the other hand, for the EP pattern without its canonical convection pattern (referred to as the nonconvective EP), extremely cold anomalies over the northern United States and western Canada are induced in its negative phase. Moreover, when there are positive sea surface temperature anomalies in the central equatorial Pacific, the frequency of occurrence of negative nonconvective EPs is 2.0 times greater than the climatological value, and thus an enhanced likelihood of extremely cold spells over North America may be expected.