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Journal Article

Determining the carrier-envelope phase of relativistic laser pulses via electron-momentum distribution

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Hatsagortsyan,  Karen Zaven
Division Prof. Dr. Christoph H. Keitel, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Keitel,  Christoph H.
Division Prof. Dr. Christoph H. Keitel, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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1809.01916.pdf
(Preprint), 9MB

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Citation

Li, Y.-F., Li, J.-X., Hatsagortsyan, K. Z., Zhao, Y.-T., Zhang, B., Li, Y.-T., et al. (2019). Determining the carrier-envelope phase of relativistic laser pulses via electron-momentum distribution. Physical Review A, 99(1): 013850. doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.99.013850.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-0EEB-6
Abstract
The impacts of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of a long relativistic tightly-focused laser pulse on the dynamics of a counter-propagating electron beam have been investigated in the, so-called, electron reflection regime, requiring the Lorentz factor of the electron $\gamma$ to be approximately two orders of magnitudes lower than the dimensionless laser field parameter $\xi$. The electrons are reflected at the rising edge of the laser pulse due to the ponderomotive force of the focused laser beam, and an asymmetric electron angular distribution emerges along the laser polarization direction, which sensitively depends on the CEP of the driving laser pulse for weak radiative stochastic effects. The CEP siganatures are observable at laser intensities of the order or larger than $10^{19}$ W/cm$^2$ and the pulse duration up to 10 cycles. The CEP detection resolution is proportional to the electron beam density and can achieve approximately $0.1^{\circ}$ at an electron density of about $10^{15}$ cm$^{-3}$. The method is applicable for currently available ultraintense laser facilities with the laser peak power from tens of terawatt to multi-petawatt region.