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Conference Paper

Synchronized Mid-Infrared Pulses at the Fritz Haber Institute IR-FEL

MPS-Authors
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Kießling,  Riko
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Gewinner,  Sandy
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Paarmann,  Alexander
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Schöllkopf,  Wieland
Molecular Physics, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Wolf,  Martin
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Kießling, R., Gewinner, S., Paarmann, A., Schöllkopf, W., & Wolf, M. (2018). Synchronized Mid-Infrared Pulses at the Fritz Haber Institute IR-FEL. In K. Bishofberger, B. Carlsten, & V. R. W. Schaa (Eds.), Proceedings of the 38th International Free-Electron Laser Conference (pp. 188-191). Geneva: JACoW. doi:10.18429/JACoW-FEL2017-MOP059.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-06EC-D
Abstract
The combined application of FEL radiation and femtosecond table-top lasers for two-color spectroscopy demands an accurate pulse synchronization. In order to employ the Infared FEL at the Fritz Haber Institute for non-linear and time-resolved experiments, an RF-over-fiber-based timing system has been established. Using a balanced optical cross-correlation scheme, we determined an FEL micro-pulse timing jitter of 100-200 fs (rms). The long-term timing drift was found to be well correlated to the energy fluctuations of the accelerated electron bunches. By means of the jitter-corrected cross-correlation signal, we directly measure the FEL pulse shape at different cavity detunings. For large cavity detuning, narrowband IR radiation (~ 0.3 % FWHM) can be generated and utilized for high-resolution non-linear spectroscopy. On the other hand, sub-picosecond pulses are provided at small detuning, which are well-suited for time-resolved measurements. At intermediate detuning values, we observe the build-up and dynamics of multipulses that result in the well-known limit-cycle power oscillations.