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Journal Article

Adaptive mechanisms that provide competitive advantages to marine bacteroidetes during microalgal blooms

MPS-Authors
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Unfried,  Frank
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Becker,  Stefan
HGF MPG Joint Research Group for Deep Sea Ecology & Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Robb,  Craig
University Bremen - MPI Joint Research Group for Marine Glycobiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Hehemann,  Jan Hendrik
University Bremen - MPI Joint Research Group for Marine Glycobiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Reintjes,  Greta
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Krüger,  Karen
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Avci,  Burak
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Kappelmann,  Lennart
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Hahnke,  Richard L.
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Fischer,  Tanja
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Harder,  Jens
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Teeling,  Hanno
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Fuchs,  Bernhard M.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Amann,  Rudolf I.
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

Unfried_2018_01.pdf
(Publisher version), 3MB

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Citation

Unfried, F., Becker, S., Robb, C., Hehemann, J. H., Markert, S., Heiden, S. E., et al. (2018). Adaptive mechanisms that provide competitive advantages to marine bacteroidetes during microalgal blooms. The ISME Journal, 12(12), 2894-2906. doi:10.1038/s41396-018-0243-5.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-B7F4-B
Abstract
Polysaccharide degradation by heterotrophic microbes is a key process within Earth's carbon cycle. Here, we use environmental proteomics and metagenomics in combination with cultivation experiments and biochemical characterizations to investigate the molecular details of in situ polysaccharide degradation mechanisms during microalgal blooms. For this, we use laminarin as a model polysaccharide. Laminarin is a ubiquitous marine storage polymer of marine microalgae and is particularly abundant during phytoplankton blooms. In this study, we show that highly specialized bacterial strains of the Bacteroidetes phylum repeatedly reached high abundances during North Sea algal blooms and dominated laminarin turnover. These genomically streamlined bacteria of the genus Formosa have an expanded set of laminarin hydrolases and transporters that belonged to the most abundant proteins in the environmental samples. In vitro experiments with cultured isolates allowed us to determine the functions of in situ expressed key enzymes and to confirm their role in laminarin utilization. It is shown that laminarin consumption of Formosa spp. is paralleled by enhanced uptake of diatom-derived peptides. This study reveals that genome reduction, enzyme fusions, transporters, and enzyme expansion as well as a tight coupling of carbon and nitrogen metabolism provide the tools, which make Formosa spp. so competitive during microalgal blooms.