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El Hermanito: El Nino’s overlooked little brother in the Atlantic

MPS-Authors

Latif,  Mojib
MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

Groetzner,  Anselm
MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

Frey,  Helmut
MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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196-Report.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

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Citation

Latif, M., Groetzner, A., & Frey, H. (1996). El Hermanito: El Nino’s overlooked little brother in the Atlantic. Report / Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie, 196.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-2A26-4
Abstract
An oscillation with a period of about 30 months has been identified in the equatorial Atlantic by analyzing sea surface temperature (SST) observations for the period 1949-1991. The 30-month time scale was also found in numerical simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) that was forced by these SSTs and a coupled ocean atmosphere general circulation model (CGCM). Consistent with the theory of tropical air-sea interactions, the Atlantic oscillation (El Hermanito) is an inherently coupled air-sea mode and can be viewed as the Atlantic analogon of the El Nifio/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon in the equatorial Pacific. El Hermanito is an internal Atlantic mode and appears to be independent of the quasi-biennial (QB) variability observed in the tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans. The discovery of El Hermanito is important to the prediction of Atlantic climate anomalies.