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Detecting regional modes of variability in observation-based surface ocean pCO2

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Landschützer,  Peter       
Director’s Research Group OES, The Ocean in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;
Observations, Analysis and Synthesis (OAS), The Ocean in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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Ilyina,  Tatiana       
Ocean Biogeochemistry, The Ocean in the Earth System, MPI for Meteorology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Landschützer, P., Ilyina, T., & Lovenduski, N. (2019). Detecting regional modes of variability in observation-based surface ocean pCO2. Geophysical Research Letters, 46, 2670-2679. doi:10.1029/2018GL081756.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-3900-D
Abstract
We use a neural network-based estimate of the sea surface partial pressure of CO 2 (pCO 2 ) derived from measurements assembled within the Surface Ocean CO 2 Atlas to investigate the dominant modes of pCO 2 variability from 1982 through 2015. Our analysis shows that detrended and deseasonalized sea surface pCO 2 varies substantially by region and the respective frequencies match those from the major modes of climate variability (Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, multivariate ENSO index, Southern Annular Mode), suggesting a climate modulated air-sea exchange of CO 2 . We find that most of the regional pCO 2 variability is driven by changes in the ocean circulation and/or changes in biology, whereas the North Atlantic variability is tightly linked to temperature variations in the surface ocean and the resulting changes in solubility. Despite the 34-year time series, our analysis reveals that we can currently only detect one to two periods of slow frequency oscillations, challenging our ability to robustly link pCO 2 variations to climate variability. ©2019. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.