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Journal Article

CCL17 exerts a neuroimmune modulatory function and is expressed in hippocampal neurons

MPS-Authors

Hansen,  Jan Niklas
Max Planck Research Group Neuroimmunology, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Max Planck Society;

Halle,  Annett
Max Planck Research Group Neuroimmunology, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Fuelle, L., Offermann, N., Hansen, J. N., Breithausen, B., Erazo, A. B., Schanz, O., et al. (2018). CCL17 exerts a neuroimmune modulatory function and is expressed in hippocampal neurons. Glia, 66(10), 2246-2261. doi:10.1002/glia.23507.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-4AD5-A
Abstract
Chemokines are important signaling molecules in the immune and nervous system. Using a fluorescence reporter mouse model, we demonstrate that the chemokine CCL17, a ligand of the chemokine receptor CCR4, is produced in the murine brain, particularly in a subset of hippocampal CA1 neurons. We found that basal expression of Ccl17 in hippocampal neurons was strongly enhanced by peripheral challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS-mediated induction of Ccl17 in the hippocampus was dependent on local tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling, whereas upregulation of Ccl22 required granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). CCL17 deficiency resulted in a diminished microglia density under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Further, microglia from naive Ccl17-deficient mice possessed a reduced cellular volume and a more polarized process tree as assessed by computer-assisted imaging analysis. Regarding the overall branching, cell surface area, and total tree length, the morphology of microglia from naive Ccl17-deficient mice resembled that of microglia from wild-type mice after LPS stimulation. In line, electrophysiological recordings indicated that CCL17 downmodulates basal synaptic transmission at CA3-CA1 Schaffer collaterals in acute slices from naive but not LPS-treated animals. Taken together, our data identify CCL17 as a homeostatic and inducible neuromodulatory chemokine affecting the presence and morphology of microglia and synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.