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Continuous-wave squeezed vacuum states of light via self-phase modulation

MPS-Authors
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Ast,  Stefan
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Mehmet,  Moritz
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Vahlbruch,  Henning
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Schnabel,  Roman
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

1903.09997.pdf
(Preprint), 632KB

oe-27-16-22408.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)
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Citation

Singh, A. P., Ast, S., Mehmet, M., Vahlbruch, H., & Schnabel, R. (2019). Continuous-wave squeezed vacuum states of light via self-phase modulation. Optics Express, 27(16), 22408-22418. doi:10.1364/OE.27.022408.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-5727-0
Abstract
Continuous-wave (cw) squeezed vacuum states of light have applications in sensing, metrology and secure communication. In recent decades their efficient generation has been based on parametric down-conversion, which requires pumping by externally generated pump light of twice the optical frequency. Currently, there is immense effort in miniaturizing squeezed-light sources for chip-integration. Designs that require just a single input wavelength are favored since they offer an easier realization. Here we report on the first direct observation of cw squeezed vacuum states generated by self-phase modulation. The wavelengths of input light and of balanced homodyne detection are identical, and 1550 nm in our case. At sideband frequencies around 1.075 GHz, a nonclassical noise reduction of (2.4 +/- 0.1) dB is observed. The setup uses a second-order nonlinear crystal, but no externally generated light of twice the frequency. Our experiment is not miniaturized, but might open a route towards simplified chip-integrated realizations.