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Repeated phenotypic evolution by different genetic routes in pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

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Gallie,  Jenna
Research Group Microbial Evolutionary Dynamics, Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Bertels,  Frederic
Research Group Microbial Molecular Evolution, Department Microbial Population Biology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Nestmann,  Sylke
Emeritus Group, Prof. E.-D. Schulze, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Rainey,  Paul B.
Department Microbial Population Biology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Gallie, J., Bertels, F., Remigi, P., Ferguson, G. C., Nestmann, S., & Rainey, P. B. (2019). Repeated phenotypic evolution by different genetic routes in pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 36(5), 1071-1085. doi:10.1093/molbev/msz040.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-6FF7-B
Abstract
Repeated evolution of functionally similar phenotypes is observed throughout the tree of life. The extent to which the underlying genetics are conserved remains an area of considerable interest. Previously, we reported the evolution of colony switching in two independent lineages of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. The phenotypic and genotypic bases of colony switching in the first lineage (Line 1) have been described elsewhere. Here, we deconstruct the evolution of colony switching in the second lineage (Line 6). We show that, as for Line 1, Line 6 colony switching results from an increase in the expression of a colanic acid-like polymer (CAP). At the genetic level, nine mutations occur in Line 6. Only one of these—a nonsynonymous point mutation in the housekeeping sigma factor rpoD—is required for colony switching. In contrast, the genetic basis of colony switching in Line 1 is a mutation in the metabolic gene carB. A molecular model has recently been proposed whereby the carB mutation increases capsulation by redressing the intracellular balance of positive (ribosomes) and negative (RsmAE/CsrA) regulators of a positive feedback loop in capsule expression. We show that Line 6 colony switching is consistent with this model; the rpoD mutation generates an increase in ribosomal gene expression, and ultimately an increase in CAP expression.