English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Flagella-like beating of a single microtubule

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons227773

Vilfan,  Andrej
Department of Living Matter Physics, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons232892

Subramani,  Smrithika
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons173472

Bodenschatz,  Eberhard
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons219873

Golestanian,  Ramin
Department of Living Matter Physics, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons232890

Guido,  Isabella
Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics, Pattern Formation and Biocomplexity, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Vilfan, A., Subramani, S., Bodenschatz, E., Golestanian, R., & Guido, I. (2019). Flagella-like beating of a single microtubule. Nano Letters, 19(5), 3359-3363. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.9b01091.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-779D-7
Abstract
Kinesin motors can induce a buckling instability in a microtubule with a fixed minus end. Here we show that by modifying the surface with a protein-repellent functionalization and using clusters of kinesin motors, the microtubule can exhibit persistent oscillatory motion resembling the beating of sperm flagella. The observed period is of the order of 1 min. From the experimental images we theoretically determine a distribution of motor forces that explains the observed shapes using a maximum likelihood approach. A good agreement is achieved with a small number of motor clusters acting simultaneously on a microtubule. The tangential forces exerted by a cluster are mostly in the range 0 - 8 pN towards the microtubule minus end, indicating the action of 1 or 2 kinesin motors. The lateral forces are distributed symmetrically and mainly below 10 pN, while the lateral velocity has a strong peak around zero. Unlike well-known models for flapping filaments, kinesins are found to have a strong “pinning” effect on the beating filaments. Our results suggest new strategies to utilize molecular motors in dynamic roles that depend sensitively on the stress built-up in the system.