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Algol as Horus in the Cairo Calendar: The Possible Means and the Motives of the Observations

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Lehtinen,  Jyri
Department Sun and Heliosphere, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Research Group in Solar and Stellar Magnetic Activity (Mag Activity) – SOLSTAR, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Porceddu, S., Jetsu, L., Markkanen, T., Lyytinen, J., Kajatkari, P., Lehtinen, J., et al. (2018). Algol as Horus in the Cairo Calendar: The Possible Means and the Motives of the Observations. Open Astronomy, 27(1), 232-263. doi:10.1515/astro-2018-0033.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-91FE-B
Abstract
An ancient Egyptian Calendar of Lucky and Unlucky Days, the Cairo Calendar (CC), assigns luck with the period of 2.850 days. Previous astronomical, astrophysical and statistical analyses of CC support the idea that this was the period of the eclipsing binary Algol three millennia ago. However, next to nothing is known about who recorded Algol’s period into CC and especially how. Here, we show that the ancient Egyptian scribes had the possible means and the motives for such astronomical observations. Their principles of describing celestial phenomena as activity of gods reveal why Algol received the title of Horus.