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Dual Coil Continuous ASL of the human brain at 9.4 T

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Schreiyäck,  M
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Bause,  J
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Scheffler,  K
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Pohmann,  R
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Schreiyäck, M., Bause, J., Scheffler, K., & Pohmann, R. (2019). Dual Coil Continuous ASL of the human brain at 9.4 T. Poster presented at 27th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2019), Montréal, QC, Canada.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-9707-B
Abstract
Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is expected to profit highly from ultra high magnetic fields because of the high SNR and the long longitudinal relaxation time. Here we show first images from dual coil continuous ASL measurements in the human brain at 9.4 T. A separate transmit channel was established to feed two small labeling coils placed at the neck. A power limiter was used to ensure subject safety. First images show strong perfusion contrast and high SNR.