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Ultrahigh spatial and temporal resolution fMRI with implanted CMOS-based planar microcoil at 14.1T

MPS-Authors
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Perez Rodas,  MA
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Merkle,  H
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Pohmann,  R
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Scheffler,  K
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Perez Rodas, M., Handwerker, J., Beyerlein, M., Merkle, H., Pohmann, R., Anders, J., et al. (2019). Ultrahigh spatial and temporal resolution fMRI with implanted CMOS-based planar microcoil at 14.1T. In ISMRM 27th Annual Meeting & Exhibition.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-9D00-C
Abstract
Compared to electrophysiological or optical recording of brain activity, fMRI has a rather low spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we propose the use of implanted microcoils for studying animal brain activity in-vivo with ultra high sensitivity compared to conventional coils. A fully integrated CMOS NMR transceiver containing an on-chip-microcoil, integrated amplifiers and a demodulator is used to acquire ultra-localized signal (10nl) at ultrahigh temporal resolution (5ms) showing unprecedented high speeds and spatial resolutions of the BOLD response.