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Elevated neopterin levels in wild, healthy chimpanzees indicate constant investment in unspecific immune system

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Behringer,  Verena       
Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;
Bonobos, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Wittig,  Roman M.       
Chimpanzees, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Crockford,  Catherine       
Chimpanzees, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Deschner,  Tobias       
Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;
Chimpanzees, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Behringer_Elevated_BMCZoo_2019.pdf
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Citation

Behringer, V., Stevens, J. M. G., Wittig, R. M., Crockford, C., Zuberbühler, K., Leendertz, F. H., et al. (2019). Elevated neopterin levels in wild, healthy chimpanzees indicate constant investment in unspecific immune system. BMC Zoology, 4: 2. doi:10.1186/s40850-019-0041-1.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-9D83-8
Abstract
Ecological immunology proposes that the optimal immune defence, and the costs coming with it, vary across environments. In environments with higher pathogen load, the immune system should experience greater challenges and, therefore, investment in maintaining it should be higher. The biomarker neopterin allows monitoring of innate immune responses, and is therefore an ideal tool to investigate the effects of ecological variables on the immune system. Here, we compared urinary neopterin levels of apparently healthy chimpanzees without acute symptoms of sickness across two environments: in captivity (22 zoos) and in the wild (two populations).