English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Conference Paper

Effects of blindfolding on verbal and gestural expression of path in auditory motion events

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons217457

Mamus,  Ezgi
Center for Language Studies , External Organizations;
Multimodal Language and Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, External Organizations;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons238262

Rissman,  Lilia
Center for Language Studies , External Organizations;
Multimodal Language and Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, External Organizations;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons142

Ozyurek,  Asli
Research Associates, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Multimodal Language and Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, External Organizations;
Communication in Social Interaction, Radboud University Nijmegen, External Organizations;

Fulltext (public)

Mamus_et_al_CogSciProceedings2019.pdf
(Publisher version), 648KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Mamus, E., Rissman, L., Majid, A., & Ozyurek, A. (2019). Effects of blindfolding on verbal and gestural expression of path in auditory motion events. In A. K. Goel, C. M. Seifert, & C. C. Freksa (Eds.), Proceedings of the 41st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2019) (pp. 2275-2281). Montreal, QB: Cognitive Science Society.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-9FA7-E
Abstract
Studies have claimed that blind people’s spatial representations are different from sighted people, and blind people display superior auditory processing. Due to the nature of auditory and haptic information, it has been proposed that blind people have spatial representations that are more sequential than sighted people. Even the temporary loss of sight—such as through blindfolding—can affect spatial representations, but not much research has been done on this topic. We compared blindfolded and sighted people’s linguistic spatial expressions and non-linguistic localization accuracy to test how blindfolding affects the representation of path in auditory motion events. We found that blindfolded people were as good as sighted people when localizing simple sounds, but they outperformed sighted people when localizing auditory motion events. Blindfolded people’s path related speech also included more sequential, and less holistic elements. Our results indicate that even temporary loss of sight influences spatial representations of auditory motion events