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Fitness consequences of a clock pollinator filter in Nicotiana attenuata flowers in nature

MPS-Authors
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Yon,  Felipe
Department of Molecular Ecology, Prof. I. T. Baldwin, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;
IMPRS on Ecological Interactions, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Kessler,  Danny
Department of Molecular Ecology, Prof. I. T. Baldwin, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Joo,  Youngsung
Department of Molecular Ecology, Prof. I. T. Baldwin, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;
IMPRS on Ecological Interactions, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Kim,  Sang-Gyu
Department of Molecular Ecology, Prof. I. T. Baldwin, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Baldwin,  Ian Thomas
Department of Molecular Ecology, Prof. I. T. Baldwin, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Yon, F., Kessler, D., Joo, Y., Kim, S.-G., & Baldwin, I. T. (2017). Fitness consequences of a clock pollinator filter in Nicotiana attenuata flowers in nature. Journal of Integrative Plant Biology, 59(11), 805-809. doi:10.1111/jipb.12579.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-B5D1-4
Abstract
Nicotiana attenuata flowers, diurnally open,
emit scents and move vertically to interact with
nocturnal hawkmoth and day-active hummingbird
pollinators. To examine the fitness consequences of
these floral rhythms, we conducted pollination trials in
the plant’s native habitat with phase-shifted flowers of
plants silenced in circadian clock genes. The results
revealed that some pollination benefits observed under
glasshouse conditions were not reproduced under
natural field conditions. Floral arrhythmicity increased
pollination success by hummingbirds, while reducing
those by hawkmoths in the field. Thus, floral circadian
rhythms may influence a plant’s fitness by filtering
pollinators leading to altered seed set from outcrossed pollen.