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Journal Article

The Role of Visual and Nonvisual Feedback in a Vehicle Steering Task

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Chatziastros,  A
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Wallis, G., Chatziastros, A., Tresilian, J., & Tomasevic, N. (2007). The Role of Visual and Nonvisual Feedback in a Vehicle Steering Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 33(5), 1127-1144. doi:10.1037/0096-1523.33.5.1127.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-BBCA-7
Abstract
This article investigates vehicle steering control, focusing on the task of lane changing and the role of different sources of sensory feedback. Participants carried out 2 experiments in a fully instrumented, motion-based simulator. Despite the high level of realism afforded by the simulator, participants were unable to complete a lane change in the absence of visual feedback. When asked to produce the steering movements required to change lanes and turn a corner, participants produced remarkably similar behavior in each case, revealing a misconception of how a lane-change maneuver is normally executed. Finally, participants were asked to change lanes in a fixed-based simulator, in the presence of intermittent visual information. Normal steering behavior could be restored using brief but suitably timed exposure to visual information. The data suggest that vehicle steering control can be characterized as a series of unidirectional, open-loop steering movements, each punctuated by a brief visual update.