English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Multiple mechanisms link prestimulus neural oscillations to sensory responses

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons238740

Iemi,  Luca
Department of Neurological Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA;
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Centre for Cognition and Decision Making, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia;

/persons/resource/persons20065

Villringer,  Arno
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany;

/persons/resource/persons201758

Nikulin,  Vadim V.
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Centre for Cognition and Decision Making, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia;
Department of Neurology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany;
Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience, Berlin, Germany;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Iemi_2019.pdf
(Publisher version), 3MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Iemi, L., Busch, N. A., Laudini, A., Haegens, S., Samaha, J., Villringer, A., et al. (2019). Multiple mechanisms link prestimulus neural oscillations to sensory responses. eLife, 8: e43620. doi:10.7554/eLife.43620.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-C7C0-3
Abstract
Spontaneous fluctuations of neural activity may explain why sensory responses vary across repeated presentations of the same physical stimulus. To test this hypothesis, we recorded electroencephalography in humans during stimulation with identical visual stimuli and analyzed how prestimulus neural oscillations modulate different stages of sensory processing reflected by distinct components of the event-related potential (ERP). We found that strong prestimulus alpha- and beta-band power resulted in a suppression of early ERP components (C1 and N150) and in an amplification of late components (after 0.4 s), even after controlling for fluctuations in 1/f aperiodic signal and sleepiness. Whereas functional inhibition of sensory processing underlies the reduction of early ERP responses, we found that the modulation of non-zero-mean oscillations (baseline shift) accounted for the amplification of late responses. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms is crucial for understanding how internal brain states modulate the processing of incoming sensory information.