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Conference Paper

Computer-Based Training Increases Efficiency in X-Ray Image Interpretation by Aviation Security Screeners

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Schwaninger,  A
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Michel, S., Koller, S., de Ruiter, J., Moerland, R., Hogervorst, M., & Schwaninger, A. (2007). Computer-Based Training Increases Efficiency in X-Ray Image Interpretation by Aviation Security Screeners. In 2007 41st Annual IEEE International Carnahan Conference on Security Technology (pp. 201-206). Piscataway, NJ, USA: IEEE.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-D1EB-8
Abstract
X-ray screening of passenger bags is an essential component of airport security. However, the most expensive equipment is of limited value, if the humans who operate it are not selected and trained appropriately. Scientific studies have shown that human performance in X-ray image interpretation depends critically on individual abilities and visual knowledge acquired through experience on the job and training. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adaptive computer-based training for increasing the detection of guns, knives, improvised explosive devices (lEDs), and other prohibited items. 97 airport security screeners of a European airport participated in this study. At the beginning of the project all airport security screeners conducted the X-ray competency assessment test (X-ray CAT). Thereupon they received adaptive computer-based training (CBT) for about 4 months. Then they conducted the X-ray CAT the second time in the middle of the project This was followed by about 4 months of CBT and a third test with X-ray CAT at the end of the project. The goal was that each screener conducts at least one 20 minute training session per week. Substantial increases of detection performance were found as a result of training, which depended on the threat category (guns, lEDs, knives and other prohibited items). The largest training effects were found for lEDs. Additional analyses showed that training not only leads to an increase of detection performance but also results in faster response times when an X-ray image contains a threat object. Thus, recurrent CBT can be a powerful tool to increase efficiency in X-ray image interpretation by airport security screeners.