English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

How bacterial cells and colonies move on solid substrates

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons205214

Poenisch,  Wolfram
Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons189429

Weber,  Christoph A.
Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons145708

Zaburdaev,  Vasily
Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

1810.03165.pdf
(Preprint), 3MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Poenisch, W., Weber, C. A., & Zaburdaev, V. (2019). How bacterial cells and colonies move on solid substrates. Physical Review E, 99(4): 042419. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.99.042419.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-D4B5-1
Abstract
Many bacteria rely on active cell appendages, such as type IV pili, to move over substrates and interact with neighboring cells. Here, we study the motion of individual cells and bacterial colonies, mediated by the collective interactions of multiple pili. It was shown experimentally that the substrate motility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae cells can be described as a persistent random walk with a persistence length that exceeds the mean pili length. Moreover, the persistence length increases for a higher number of pili per cell. With the help of a simple, tractable stochastic model, we test whether a tug of war without directional memory can explain the persistent motion of single Neisseria gonorrhoeae cells. While persistent motion of single cells indeed emerges naturally in the model, a tug of war alone is not capable of explaining the motility of microcolonies, which becomes weaker with increasing colony size. We suggest sliding friction between the microcolonies and the substrate as the missing ingredient. While such friction almost does not affect the general mechanism of single cell motility, it has a strong effect on colony motility. We validate the theoretical predictions by using a three-dimensional computational model that includes explicit details of the pili dynamics, force generation, and geometry of cells.